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How Working Out Benefits Our Eyes

Exercise improves our mood, keeps our bodies fit, and decreases risk for certain diseases. Did you know that exercise may also reduce your risk for eye disease?

Exercise Keeps Our Eyes Feeling Young!

Studies show that regular physical activity may decrease our chances of developing age-related eye diseases like glaucoma and macular degeneration. In a study of over 5,000 people, regular exercise decreased the incidence of glaucoma by 25%. How does this work? A controlled lab study of mice showed that regular exercise bolstered the eyes’ natural defenses against degeneration.

A Healthy Lifestyle Protects Against Weight-Related Eye Problems

Some eye diseases are linked to unhealthy weight problems. For example, high blood pressure can cause eye strain, damaging delicate nerves and blood vessels. Studies also show a link between obesity and increased age-related cataract risk. For those who suffer from diabetes, diabetic retinopathy is one of the leading causes of blindness in adults. A healthy, active lifestyle helps you protect against, and manage, problems like diabetes and hypertension.

4 Ways To Make Exercise A Part Of Each Day

  1. Find activities you enjoy! If you like soccer, join a city league. If hiking is more your thing, pick a hiking day each week.
  2. Make activity part of your daily routine. We’re creatures of habit! Pick a time of day and set it aside for exercise.
  3. Find a buddy. Exercising with a friend, spouse, or co-worker can make it more enjoyable and help you stick to your goals.
  4. Something is better than nothing! It’s okay to do your daily workout in pieces. Take a walk on your work break, and do a few squats while watching TV.

Simple Exercises You Can Do Anywhere

We Care About Your Whole Body Health

As your partner for a lifetime of good health, we want to empower our patients to live lifestyles that support healthy vision AND a healthy body. Find a Vision Source® practice near you, and be part of a practice that cares for your long-term vision health. 

Top image by Flickr user Richard Masoner/Cyclelicious used under Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike 4.0 license. Image cropped and modified from original.

Author Vision Source — Published June 29, 2015